Subordinate clauses: weil

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A main clause generally consists of at least a subject and a conjugated verb. It is complete both grammatically and in terms of content and is thus self-contained.

A subordinate clause cannot normally stand alone. It is dependent on a superordinate main clause or subordinate clause. There is a comma between the superordinate main clause and the subordinate clause. The conjugated verb is usually right at the end of a subordinate clause. Many subordinate clauses are connected to the superordinate clause by certain introductory words. One of these introductory words is the conjunction weil. A subordinate clause beginning with weil answers the question "why?". The interrogatives warum, wieso or weshalb are used to inquire as to a reason.

 

 

Grammatical terms in German:

der Hauptsatz: A main clause generally consists of a subject and a conjugated verb. It is a self-contained sentence which may stand alone. In a simple statement sentence the verb is the second idea.

der Nebensatz: A subordinate clause cannot normally stand alone. It is dependent on a superordinate main clause or another subordinate clause. The conjugated verb is normally right at the end of a subordinate clause. Many subordinate clauses are linked to the superordinate clause by certain introductory words.